About the Chaplain

father moloney black and white

Fr. Daniel Patrick Moloney, Ph.D.

Fr. Moloney, a priest for the Archdiocese of Boston, has been the Catholic chaplain at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 2015. He is the author of the book Mercy: What Every Catholic Should Know (Ignatius Press, 2020).

Fr. Moloney received his doctorate in philosophy in 2004 from the University of Notre Dame, where he also earned a master's degree. He earned a bachelor's degree in religious studies from Yale University in 1994, with distinction, and a Bachelors of Sacred Theology from the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross in Rome, graduating magna cum laude. After earning his doctorate, he was appointed Lecturer on religion, politics, and American constitutional law in the Department of Politics at Princeton University, and was affiliated with the university's James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions. He also was Postdoctoral fellow at the Witherspoon Institute in Princeton.

From 2007-8, he was a Senior Policy Analyst at the DeVos Center for Religion and Civil Society at The Heritage Foundation, where he studied policy issues affecting family, religion, marriage and culture civil society in America.

Putting aside a promising career as a public intellectual (at least for a time), he entered St. John's Seminary for the Archdiocese of Boston. He was ordained by Cardinal Sean O'Malley in 2010.

Fr. Moloney is a prolific writer, having published more than 30 articles and book reviews in publications such as The Wall Street Journal, National Review, Crisis and First Things, a New York-based religious journal where from 1998 to 2001 he was an the Associate Editor. He has written and published articles and policy papers having to do with health care and the international AIDS crisis, Harry Potter and His Dark Materials, John Rawls and contemporary political theory, criminal punishment, medieval philosophy (specifically St. Anselm of Canterbury), and lots of stuff about mercy (the topic of his dissertation at Notre Dame). 
 
He is fluent in Spanish and spent the first several years of his priesthood celebrating the sacraments in Spanish and serving immigrant communities. He blogs at spiritualdirections.tumblr.com.